Emma Brinley Buckley

A researcher, data-wrangler, and digital-media creator at the University of Nebraska at Kearney, Emma enjoys tinkering with ways to derive and convey information using image-analysis, sound recordings, hydrologic monitoring, and data visualization. She obtained a bachelor’s degree at Green Mountain College in Vermont and a master’s degree in Natural Resource Sciences at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln, where her collaboration with the PBT started. She appreciates a good/terrible pun, playing as many games as possible, and finds solace roaming the Great Plains with her partner and two dogs, camera in hand.

Emma's Work

On August 21, 2017, the moon aligned between the earth and sun, casting a shadow that moved over the United States from Oregon to South Carolina, passing through Nebraska. Dubbed The Great American Eclipse, thousands of people flocked to the state to witness the once in a lifetime event. In addition to the thousands of […]

At first look, the Great Plain’s most striking characteristic is often the vast, open horizon that may invoke a sense of emptiness. While driving along I-80 through central Nebraska, it is easy to dismiss the surrounding land as monotonous – a lackluster flip-book of crop fields where each page is exactly the same. But hidden among the sea […]

As a graduate student at UNL, a lot of my time revolves around my research. My thesis comprises applications of time-lapse imagery to communicate ecosystem changes. My days consist of ogling PBT’s photographs, glaring at data (data acquired from either 1. pixel-analysis of the time-lapse images, or 2. collected concurrently alongside PBT’s cameras with recorders […]

While staring at the Platte River this past week, I grappled with the severity of the drought in California and the mandatory restrictions of water use there. It was intangible, a concept I just couldn’t grasp while watching the girth of surface water flooding Nebraska this year. California farmers are losing crops because there isn’t […]

Last week I ventured out to the Central Platte with Mikes-squared (that’s both Mike Forsberg and Mike Farrell) and a film crew. What started out as a pretty normal 15 degree day ended with a peculiar appearance of an orange buoy, dancing in a field, and Forsberg sprawled out in a drainage pipe. To further […]

Cranes roosting in shallow channels during migration, eagles diving for food and returning to nests on the river’s bank, turtles sunning themselves on logs protruding from the water, and frogs calling from adjacent wetlands. We’re familiar with the more apparent wonders of wildlife, but what about the life that exists under the water- in the […]

Lake Agnes is the location for PBT’s highest elevation time-lapse camera, an alpine lake nestled in the Never Summer Range of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. It is also the beginning of the Platte River’s story. In late January the PBT team trekked up 11,000 feet to the camera on the edge of the lake […]

I’ve been asked to document my educational experience with PBT, so here is my introduction. My name is Emma and I was born and raised in Connecticut (not the argyle & tie section of the state, but the Appalachian trail, FFA-loving, small town part- yes that exists), and arrived in the Midwest to attend graduate […]