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Livestreams

This page is dedicated to our live cameras we have installed across the Platte River Basin.

Pardon our digital dust- this page is currently under development!

Beaver Lodge

Location: Central Platte River, Crane Trust Property

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About the Location

Located on the Crane Trust Property , this lodge is protected as part of their 10,000 acres of conserved prairie on the Big Bend region of the Platte River in Nebraska.

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The Subject

This beaver lodge separates a manmade lake from a beaver-inhabited wetland. American beavers are the primary inhabitants of this lodge, but other popular sights here are great blue herons, American coots, red-winged blackbirds, and painted turtles. A recent study showed that beaver activity soars in the summer and fall, but drops off during the colder months when other animals utilize the woody home.

Research by Simon Tye, former PBT researcher and current PhD student in the Siepielski Lab at the University of Arkansas

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Other Facts

  • The cameras of this beaver lodge are mounted four feet apart on the same post.
  • During the winter, other animals frequented the lodge more so than the beavers themselves. Some of these animals include great horned owls, North American raccoons, and small mammals.

Underwater Beaver Lodge

Location: Central Platte River, Crane Trust Property

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About the Location

Located on the Crane Trust Property , this lodge is protected as part of their 10,000 acres of conserved prairie on the Big Bend region of the Platte River in Nebraska

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The Subject

This beaver lodge separates a manmade lake from a beaver-inhabited wetland. American beavers are the primary inhabitants of this lodge, but other popular sights here are great blue herons, American coots, red-winged blackbirds, and painted turtles. A recent study showed that beaver activity soars in the summer and fall, but drops off during the colder months when other animals utilize the woody home.

Research by Simon Tye, former PBT researcher and current PhD student in the Siepielski Lab at the University of Arkansas

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Other Facts

  • The cameras of this beaver lodge are mounted four feet apart on the same post.
  • During the winter, several other species were more commonly observed taking advantage of this beaver lodge than the beavers themselves. Some of these animals include great horned owls, northern raccoons, and small mammals.

Audubon's Rowe Sanctuary

Location: Platte River, Central Nebraska

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About the Location

Audubon’s Rowe Sanctuary, formally known as Iain Nicolson Audubon Center at Rowe Sanctuary , aims to preserve and protect the Platte River ecosystem and its bird species. The sanctuary offers tours along the Platte during crane migration season and educates about Nebraska cranes via school lectures and summer camps.

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The Subject

Positioned to get a sky-high view, this camera captures a wide area of Sandhill Cranes and river wildlife such as deer, bobcats, and other birds. As the cranes hunt for food during the day, the best time to monitor them will be during sunrise or sunset.

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Other Facts

  • This camera perches on a 35 foot viewing tower that captures a scene above the live crane camera that the sanctuary offers.
  • Our camera at Audubon’s Rowe Sanctuary was Platte Basin Timelapse’s first live camera!

Kingsley Dam

Location: Western Nebraska

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About the Location

Mounted on a communication tower on top of a public power and irrigation district office in western Nebraska, this camera overlooks Kingsley Dam. On the left of the dam lies Lake McConaughy and on the right, Lake Ogallala.

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The Subject

At twenty miles long, four miles wide, and 142 feet deep, Lake McConaughy presides as the largest reservoir in Nebraska. Nested on the opposite side of Kingsley Dam is the “little lake”, Lake Ogallala. Although created as an overfill space for Lake McConaughy material during the construction of the dam, the half-mile long and a quarter mile wide “little lake” has become an important recreation spot for fisherman and boaters alike. The Nebraska Games and Parks Commision supports the Lake McConaughy State Recreation Center , and the lake is a popular destination for watersports, camping, and hunting.

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Other Facts

  • Renowned for several fish species including rainbow trout and catfish, Lake McConaughy’s walleye fish population attracts competitive fishers from around the state. The state record for largest walleye was found in Lake McConaughy at 16lb. 2oz.
  • The rooster tail pulls the cool, low-oxygenated water from the bottom of Lake McConaughy and sprays the water into Lake Ogallala. By spraying the water, this puts oxygen back into the water which is important for sustaining fish populations.

Bald Eagle's Nest

Location: Loup County, Nebraska

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About the Location

This camera is placed in Nebraska’s fifth least-populous county, according to the US Census, Loup County. Unlike our other live cameras, this camera is mounted to a mobile stand that allows it to be easily transported to anywhere in the area.

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The Subject

According to Birds of Nebraska, since the first recorded bald eagle nesting in 1991, the Nebraska bald eagle population has jumped to at least 209 nests as of 2017. Around 80% of these nests preside along the eastern Platte River.

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Other Facts

  • Renowned for several fish species including rainbow trout and catfish, Lake McConaughy’s walleye fish population attracts competitive fishers from around the state. The state record for largest walleye was found in Lake McConaughy at 16lb. 2oz.
  • Low oxygen levels in Lake McConaughy caused the construction of the “rooster tail”. The rooster tail pulls the cool, low-oxygenated water from the bottom of the lake and sprays it out over the lake's surface.

Gudmundsen Research Station

Location: Nebraska Sandhills

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About the Location

Since 1981, the researchers at the UNL Gudmundsen Research Station have been studying the ecology, economics, and geology of the Nebraska Sandhills. Gudmundsen’s 1,200 acres of wetland prairies and 11,600 acres of sandhills allow for extensive research opportunities in this rare and unique ecosystem.

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The Subject

The windmill captured in this camera is one of several windmills on the Gudmundsen property. Each windmill pulls water from the Ogallala Aquifer, and cows gather around the pool to drink or cool off on a hot day.

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Other Facts

  • Platte Basin Timelapse has a timelapse camera, called the Sandhill Windmill, located at the pool and windmill shown in this livestream.
  • The Ogallala or High Plains Aquifer is the largest aquifer in North America, and one of the largest in the world.

Platte River at the Crane Trust

Location: Central Nebraska

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About the Location

Since 1978, the Crane Trust has been working to preserve and research the hydrological and biological features of the Big Bend region of the Platte River. This region supports several endangered species, including the namesake species of the preserve, sandhill and whooping cranes.

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The Subject

Sandhill cranes primarily live and migrate in North America, but they have also been observed in Siberia. They primarily breed in northern regions and migrate south during the winter months.

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Other Facts

  • Nearly 75% of all migrating sandhill cranes stop at the Platte River in Nebraska during their journey south.
  • In 1941, only 16 whooping cranes remained in the world. Today, the species is still endangered, but populations are trending up, and there are at least 300 worldwide.