River

Mittlestets Meander

Mittlestets Meander

Located on the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory, this camera captures the winding stream of a branch of the Middle Loup River as it cuts through the Nebraska Sandhills. “Mick’s Slide” is in the back of the frame and is a blowout of sand in the hillside. “Mick’s Slide” has taught UNL researchers much about the geology and evolution of the Nebraska Sandhills, the largest stabilized sand dune region in the hemisphere. This camera is tied to Aaron Middlestet and his team doing research studying streamflow. He is a UNL assistant professor in Biosystems Engineering.

Whalen Diversion Dam Upstream

Whalen Diversion Dam Upstream

Whalen Diversion Dam is roughly 10 miles downstream of Guernsey Dam and Reservoir, the last major dam on the North Platte in Wyoming. The dam diverts water into the Interstate and Fort Laramie Canals and is then distributed to farms in Wyoming and Nebraska for irrigation. Two cameras are mounted on the same pole, looking upstream and downstream. The downstream view looks over the North Platte River behind the dam and the north irrigation canal. It diverts water into a vast array of irrigation canals and ditches throughout the state of Wyoming and Nebraska. This camera has been retired.

Whalen Diversion Dam Canal

Whalen Diversion Dam Canal

Whalen Diversion Dam is roughly 10 miles downstream of Guernsey Dam and Reservoir, the last major dam on the North Platte in Wyoming. The dam diverts water into the Interstate and Fort Laramie Canals and is then distributed to farms in Wyoming and Nebraska for irrigation. Two cameras are mounted on the same pole, looking upstream and downstream. The downstream view looks over the North Platte River behind the dam and the north irrigation canal. It diverts water into a vast array of irrigation canals and ditches throughout the state of Wyoming and Nebraska. This camera has been retired.

Crane Trust Headquarters

Crane Trust Headquarters

This location views the main channel of the Platte River, southwest of Grand Island, Nebraska, at the Crane Trust. This stretch of river is managed actively to maintain wide, open channels relatively free from disturbance. During spring migration, sandhill cranes and whooping cranes roost nightly on the shallow sandbars and forage and rest by day in surrounding fields and wet meadows.

Fremont Canyon

Fremont Canyon

The camera at Fremont Canyon is just downstream from Pathfinder Dam. It was through this canyon that explorer John Charles Fremont attempted to run the river in a wooden boat in 1842 and was capsized in the rapids downstream, losing his valuable surveying instruments. Today under “normal conditions” the North Platte River enters the canyon through the needle valve outlet of Pathfinder Dam and also farther downstream at a power plant connected to the reservoir through a three mile long tunnel.

Elkhorn River Research Station

Elkhorn River Research Station

This camera looks upstream at the Elkhorn River Research Station, managed by the University of Nebraska–Omaha. In 2011, the University of Nebraska at Omaha partnered with the Papio-Missouri River NRD to construct the Elkhorn River Research Station (ERRS). The ERRS was designed to provide a secure, controlled environment in which UNO students and faculty can perform river-based experiments. The Elkhorn River is groundwater fed drains the northeastern part of Nebraska.

Near Plum Creek

Near Plum Creek

This camera is oriented to the southeast and looks downstream on land owned by the Nebraska Public Power District. The area is an active study site for the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program researching river flow and sediment strategies. The river islands like the one in the frame are periodically disked to keep vegetation in check. Trees were cleared along the south bank to create more open habitat in 2010-2011. This is a foraging area for the federally endangered least terns and piping plovers and is periodically used as a crane roost. This camera was retired several years ago.

Upper Elkhorn River

Upper Elkhorn River

Near Norfolk, Nebraska, this camera looks upstream at the Elkhorn River. The Elkhorn River is located in the northeastern part of the state. It is fed by groundwater from the Ogallala Aquifer and is one of the largest tributaries of the Platte River. The river flows for 290 miles through wild and agricultural lands before it joins the Platte just south of Omaha.

Missouri Confluence

Missouri Confluence

This camera is located at the confluence of the Platte and Missouri rivers at Schilling Wildlife Management Area near Plattsmouth, Nebraska, south of Omaha. After a 1352 river-mile journey and draining 90,000 square miles, the water here reaches the lowest point in the watershed and the eastern end of the Platte River Basin. In 2019 this camera was lost to the river due to a historic flooding event and likely in the Gulf of Mexico.

Mick’s Slide

Mick’s Slide

Located on the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory, this camera captures the winding stream of a branch of the Middle Loup River as it cuts through the Nebraska Sandhills. “Mick’s Slide” is in the back of the frame and is a blowout of sand in the hillside. “Mick’s Slide” has taught UNL researchers much about the geology and evolution of the Nebraska Sandhills, the largest stabilized sand dune region in the hemisphere.

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