Nebraska

Marsh Wren Little Salt Creek

Marsh Wren Little Salt Creek

Located at the confluence of Little Salt Creek and Salt Creek on the Marsh Wren Community Wetland, this camera looks upstream along Little Salt Creek. Both creeks were channelized and straightened long ago, primarily for flood control. The result has been deepening and widening of previously shallow channels that frequently connected with the floodplain. Once seen along the banks, the unique saline characteristics will be mimicked here by modifying the existing banks and constructing saline habitat shelves that scientists and engineers believe will once again provide habitat for the endangered Salt Creek tiger beetle.

Camp Ashland East Slough

Camp Ashland East Slough

This camera is looking downstream from near the inlet of a restored slough on Nebraska National Guard property. This slough is fed by groundwater from a nearby wetland and the Platte River a few hundred yards to the north. The USGS has installed two data logging devices on the slough to measure various variables relating to water quality. The University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s School of Natural Resources, has been monitoring the slough for its diversity and health of aquatic life, especially fish species.

Camp Ashland Chute Outlet

Camp Ashland Chute Outlet

Overlooking the inlet of a backwater chute at the Camp Ashland Training Site, NE. The lower Platte River is located in the background. It is anticipated that there will be periods of high water events from ice jams and Spring rainfall over time. These water events will naturally widen the inlet and scour the existing bank line creating habitat for wildlife and allow for sediment nutrient exchange. This process will benefit all wildlife species that utilize the area.

Camp Ashland Chute

Camp Ashland Chute

Looking north along a restored channel of a backwater chute at the Camp Ashland Training Site, NE. This area was historically connected to the lower Platte River, but hardening of banks along the Platte River eliminated the connectivity to the River and became silted and vegetated over time. With this restored backwater area we anticipate seeing meandering of this chute through high water flows from ice jams and spring rain runoff which will provide habitat for all wildlife that utilize the Platte River, fish spawning, and sediment nutrient exchange between the Platte River and floodplain.

Nebraska Game and Parks Wetland

Nebraska Game and Parks Wetland

Standing at 11ft tall, this camera looks at the day-to-day rhythm of a wetland in a highly urbanized landscape. Behind the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission building quietly stirs a small, but important wetland feature. This area was previously a mowed patch of lawn grass, but in 1999 construction began on a wetland feature that would clean and filter runoff from adjacent parking lots. Wildlife of all kinds has used this space as a home, or stopover on their migration. It has since been overtaken by invasive narrow-leaved cattail, although current management techniques are underway to improve the wetland’s function in a 21st-century landscape.

Bobcat Wetland

Bobcat Wetland

Along the banks of a tributary of the Haines Branch in the Prairie Corridor, a camera bears witness to the changes that happen at an intersection of prairie and wetland. This habitat, known as a prairie seep wetland, is part of a larger complex of interconnected prairies, wetlands and woodlands that span from Pioneers Park in Lincoln, NE, southwest to Spring Creek Prairie in Denton, NE. This camera looks slightly downwards at the clear and slow flowing tributary, while capturing in the second half of its frame, the seep wetland and subsequent prairie which directs rain and below ground water out to the creek. By watching how peak water flows we can see the happenings upstream that can have compounding effects further downstream.

Dakota Springs

Dakota Springs

Nebraska’s eastern saline wetlands were nearly all destroyed from a century and more of growth of the City of Lincoln, modification of Salt Creek and its tributaries, and land development for agricultural use. The saline wetlands are considered one of the most restricted natural communities in Nebraska. Today, there are efforts from the community and a partnership of conservation agencies to conserve the remaining remnants of these unique wetlands. This camera focuses from above on an area where salt-loving plants are abundant. Saline groundwater rises to the surface continually in this former oxbow of Little Salt Creek still containing the framework of an old railroad trestle.

Knott Prairie

Knott Prairie

Knott Prairie is an unplowed tallgrass prairie owned by the Wachiska Audubon Society. Located on the floodplain of the Platte River, the plant community of this prairie is highly influenced by groundwater flows and is home to a number of unique plant species. Haying and prescribed fire are used as management tools at this location.

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